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NECK AND SHOULDERS

whole health osteopathy neck and shoulder pain

Neck and shoulder pain is a very common pain complaint and it is a major public health problem, both in terms of personal health and overall well-being. Approximately half of all individuals will experience a clinically important neck pain episode over the course of their lifetime.

 

It is also amazing how much neck and shoulder pain people will put up with, and just ignore because they think it’s “normal” to be tight and achy” through their upper back. What some people also don’t realise, is that many neck complaints can stem from weakness or tightness in the shoulders or shoulder blades. 

NECK PAIN
COMMON PAIN COMPLAINTS
OF THE NECK AND SHOULDER

Neck pain is very common and will affect most people at some point in their lives. Many things can cause neck pain, but it is usually not a sign of a more serious condition.

 

Neck pain can be mild or severe. It can also impact other parts of your body. The pain often spreads from the neck towards the shoulders or upper back, and it can cause headaches.

As neck pain may be caused by a variety of things, not everyone will feel better straight away.

 

Sometimes you may be referred to another health practitioner.

Whiplash injuries

Desk disease
Cervical disc injuries
Cervical facet sprain
Myofascial pain with trigger points
Wryneck
Arthritic pain
Postural instability and muscle weaknesses  Thoracic outlet syndrome

Cervicogenic headaches or tension headaches 

Bursitis

AC joint separation and shoulder dislocations

 Rotator cuff impingement

Tendonitis

Frozen shoulder

Shoulder impingements

Tendinopathies or Tendonitis

Jaw pain from teeth clenching grinding. 

SHOULDER PAIN
HOW CAN MY OSTEOPATH WORK WITH MY SHOULDER PAIN?

Shoulder pain is very common, with 1 in 3 people will experience shoulder pain at some point in their life. The risk of shoulder pain increases with age.

The shoulder joint is complex. Many things can cause shoulder pain. In younger people, shoulder pain is more likely to be due to an accident or injury.

However, as you get older, natural wear and tear occurs in the shoulder joint and the rotator cuff tendon. Over time, this may become persistent.

  • Improve muscle flexibility in the shoulder area
     

  • Address postural strains and bad habits
     

  • Provide exercises for stretching and recovery
     

  • Improve range of joint motion in the mid back, neck, shoulder blade and shoulder
     

  • Provide advice on maintaining flexibility and strength around the shoulder region
     

  • Help you change the way you do some activities, to help reduce pain and prevent further injury

What the evidence says...

Evidence suggests that osteopathic techniques, such as manual therapy and needling, may relieve neck pain, if the pain is not caused by a serious health condition. Patients may experience a reduction in pain, increased movement and relief from headaches. References Yu, H., et al ‘Does structured patient education improve the recovery and clinical outcomes of patients with neck pain? A systematic review from the Ontario Protocol for Traffic Injury Management (OPTIMa) Collaboration, The Spine Journal (2014); 16 (12) Huisman, P., et al ‘The effect of thoracic spine manipulation on pain and disability in patients with non-specific neck pain: A systematic review’, Disability and Rehabilitation (2013); 35 (20) Miller, J., et al ‘Manual therapy and exercise for neck pain: a systematic review’, Manual Therapy (2010) Aug; 15(4) Miller, J., et al ‘Manual therapy and exercise for neck pain: a systematic review’, Manual Therapy (2010) Aug; 15(4) Sihawong, R., et al ‘Exercise therapy for office workers with nonspecific neck pain: a systematic review’, Journal of Manipulative Physiological Therapeutics (2011) Jan; 34(1) Gross, A., et al, ‘Exercises for Mechanical Neck Disorders’, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2015); 1 Ylinen, J., ‘Physical exercises and functional rehabilitation for the management of chronic neck pain’, Eura Medicophys (2007); 43 Liu, L., et al, ‘Effectiveness of dry needling for myofascial trigger points associated with neck and shoulder pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis’, Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (2015); 96 (5) Yu, H., et al ‘Does structured patient education improve the recovery and clinical outcomes of patients with neck pain? A systematic review from the Ontario Protocol for Traffic Injury Management (OPTIMa) Collaboration, The Spine Journal (2014); 16 (12) Further information: https://whatisosteo.com/body-map/neck-pain/

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